Seminar Colour Guide:              
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 26 May 2017, 10:00Add to calendarThe social brain in adolescenceSarah-Jayne Blakemore, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, UCL, London, UK, , United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: This talk focuses on how the social brain, that is the network of brain regions involved in understanding others, develops during adolescence. Social cognitive processes involved in navigating an increasingly complex social world continue to develop throughout human adolescence. Areas of the social brain undergo significant reorganisation in terms of structure and function during the second decade of life, which possibly reflects a sensitive period for adapting to the social environment. The changes in social environment that occur during adolescence interact with increasing executive functions, heightened social sensitivity and the developing social brain to influence a number of adolescent behaviours, including risk-taking, peer influence and self-consciousness.
Tags: Neurobiology
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 29 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarDiscovery of Hybrid Peptides in Autoimmune DiseaseThomas Delong, UC Denver, USAHost: Lars VeltenSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: A central question driving type 1 diabetes (T1D) research is why the pancreatic beta cell is singled out for destruction by the immune system. Abnormal post-translational protein modifications leading to the alteration of self-proteins have been shown to play a central role in various autoimmune diseases and could provide a plausible explanation why the insulin producing beta cells are targeted by autoreactive T cells leading to the development of T1D. We used CD4 T cell clones that were isolated either from the residual islets of T1D patients, or from diabetic NOD mice to investigate antigens for autoreactive T cells. We show that T cells from both groups react to peptides that are formed upon covalent crosslinking of specific insulin C-Peptide fragments to naturally occurring peptide cleavage products of proteins such as chromogranin A, islet amyloid polypeptide, or neuropeptide Y. These hybrid insulin peptides (HIPs) are extremely antigenic for the T cells and we provide direct physical evidence through mass spectrometry that HIPs are formed in murine beta cells. The demonstration that these modified peptides exist and that pathogenic T cells target them provides a logical and highly novel explanation of how immune tolerance may be broken in T1D.
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Monday, 29 May 2017, 14:00Add to calendarEarly co-transcriptional assembly of single ribosomes in real-timeOlivier Duss, The Scripps Research Institute, USAHost: Janosch HennigSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Biophysics, Cell Biology, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Gene Regulation, RNA, Structural Biology
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 30 May 2017, 11:00Add to calendarSpindle assembly checkpoint control in animal embryonic mitosis.Stefania Castagnetti, Marine Station Villefranche sur Mer, Nice, FranceHost: Stefano De RenzisSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Tuesday, 30 May 2017, 14:00Add to calendarRegulated membrane remodeling by Mic60 controls formation of mitochondrial crista junctions
Manuel Hessenberger, MDC Berlin, GermanyHost: Carsten SachseRoom 329, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Structural Biology, Biophysics, Cell Biology
Company Representative
Thursday, 1 June 2017, 10:00Add to calendarOMX SR: The next generation live cell fluorescence microscopy platform - Beating confocal in contrast, resolution and speed, with 3D-SIM, TIRF-SIM, and Image Contrast Restoration, using the same samples you already have.
Daniel White, GE Healthcare, GermanyHost: Rainer PepperkokRoom 13-518 a + b, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 2 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAndrew Leach, The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Genome Campus, United KingdomHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 9 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarInhibitory control of cortical microcircuitsAlberto Bacci, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière ICM (Brain & Spine Institute), Paris, FranceHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: In the mammalian neocortex, inhibitory interneurons encompass a vast number of cell subclasses, and this rich diversity results in an efficient division of labor within neuronal circuits that governs virtually all forms of cortical activity. Some interneuron types control principal neuron (PN) dendritic integration of distal excitatory inputs, whereas perisomatic targeting interneurons control PN output and synchronize them during network oscillations underlying several cognitive functions. In this presentation, I will focus on perisomatic-targeting, parvalbumin (PV)-expressing basket cells. I will describe: i) their connectivity patterns within cortical circuits; ii) their role in organizing the information transfer across cortical networks during the emergence of γ-oscillations, and iii) the mechanisms and functional roles of a specific form of long-term plasticity of their GABAergic inhibitory synapses.
Science and Society
Friday, 9 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarDo microbes control the mind? Issues in brain, gut and microbiota researchMaureen O'Malley, University of Bordeaux, FranceHost: Rob MeijersSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Abstract: Microbiota research uses a sequencing-based approach to examine the composition and function of microbial communities in specific niches. Some of the most intensive research in this area has been carried out on the gut microbiota of animals, particularly humans and mice. Many associations have been made between microbiota composition and various health or disease states. A rapidly expanding area of investigation is concerned with the connections between animal gut microbiota, the enteric nervous system, and various brain and behavioural states. Links have been made between microbiota composition and disorders such as autism, anxiety and depression. Microbiota even seem to influence general cognition and memory. Many strong interpretations have been made of these findings, including claims that microbiota control animal behaviour in the manner of puppeteers controlling puppets. I will examine these claims in the context of a variety of problems in microbiota research methodology and what they can say about causality.
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Monday, 12 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarHuman-specific genes and neural stem cell amplification and neocortex expansion in development and human evolutionWieland Huttner, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract:
Our group studies neural stem and progenitor cells in the context of the expansion of the neocortex in development and evolution. Two major classes of cortical stem/progenitor cells can be distinguished. First, stem/progenitor cells that reside in the ventricular zone (VZ), i.e. neuroepithelial cells, apical radial glia (aRG) and apical intermediate progenitors, collectively referred to as apical progenitors (APs). Second, stem/progenitor cells that reside in the subventricular zone (SVZ), i.e. basal radial glia (bRG) and basal intermediate progenitors, collectively referred to as basal progenitors (BPs). Neocortex expansion is thought to be linked to an increased abundance and proliferative capacity of BPs.
To gain insight into the genomic changes that underlie neocortex expansion, notably in humans, we have analyzed the transcriptomes of human vs. mouse VZ and SVZ, and of human vs. mouse aRG and bRG. This led to the identification of the human-specific gene ARHGAP11B as a major player. Specifically, ARHGAP11B promotes the generation of BPs from aRG and the subsequent BP proliferation, thereby increasing BP abundance. Moreover, ARHGAP11B is able to induce folding of the embryonic mouse neocortex, which normally is smooth. The ability of ARHGAP11B to amplify BPs is based on a single C-to-G base substitution which creates a novel splice donor site; this leads to the removal of 55 nucleotides upon mRNA splicing, resulting in a reading frame shift and generating a human-specific 47-amino acid sequence that is thought to be key for BP amplification.
To compare neural stem cell division between human and great ape developing neocortex, we have performed live imaging using iPSC-derived 3D cerebral organoids. This revealed a specific lengthening of metaphase during AP mitosis in human as compared to chimpanzee and orangutan. The potential implications of this metaphase lengthening will be discussed.
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 12 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendar"The structure of the nuclear pore complex"Andre Hoelz, Howard Hughes Medical Institute & Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering California Institute of Technology, USAHost: Edward LemkeSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology, Biophysics, Structural Biology, Systems Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 16 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedClement Blanchet, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Tuesday, 20 June 2017, 15:00Add to calendarCatastrophic Thinking: Extinction and the Value of DiversityDavid Sepkoski, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, GermanyHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Why do we care about preserving biodiversity? At the beginning of the 21st century biodiversity has come to be seen as an intrinsic scientific and cultural value. In other words, biological diversity the sheer multiplicity and heterogeneity of living things is now understood to have an inherent value that is not reducible to the utilitarian or aesthetic worth of any particular individual species: the value of diversity is diversity itself. Extinction plays a central role in this understanding of biodiversity, since diversity is something that is understood to be fragile and tenuous, constantly endangered by the threat of loss. Whereas most historians who have examined this phenomenon have placed the modern biodiversity movement in the context of a history of conservation biology and endangered species protection, I want to frame it in a new perspective. This talk will examine the influence of biological theories about the nature and dynamics of extinction and especially mass extinction on the current valuation of biological diversity. I will focus particularly on the ways that new understandings of extinction in the past for example, the extinction of the dinosaurs have converged with scientific and cultural anxieties about the present the specters of global warming, nuclear war, and biodiversity loss. I will argue that this new model of extinction has played a prominent conceptual and rhetorical role in debates surrounding the current biodiversity crisis, which I will examine in critical historical perspective.
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 23 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarFunction regulation of enzymes from central carbon metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Iva Pichová, Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech RepublicHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Tuesday, 27 June 2017, 11:00Add to calendarCo-transcriptional splicingMaria Carmo-Fonseca , University of Lisbon, PortugalHost: Isabel Chillon EMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 30 June 2017, 13:00Add to calendarResolution and validation of SAS-based structural modelsAnne Tuukkanen, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Dmitri SvergunSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 6 July 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedOlivier Pourquié, Harvard Medical School, Department of Genetics/The Brigham and Women s Hospital, USAHost: Alexander AulehlaThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 7 July 2017, 13:00Add to calendarSmall angle scattering data and model validation at SASBDBAl Kikhney, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Dmitri SvergunSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Seminar given by an external postdoc
Thursday, 13 July 2017, 15:00Add to calendarRegulation of Autophagy by the Atg1 KinaseAnne Schreiber, ETH Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Christian HäringSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Tags: Cell Biology
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 28 July 2017, 13:00Add to calendarMolecular mechanisms behind DAPK regulation: how phosphorylation switches workAnne-Sophie Huart, EMBL Hamburg, GermanyHost: Matthias WilmannsSeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
External Faculty Speaker
Wednesday, 2 August 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEndogenous chromosomal lesions: How cells deal with unavoidable DNA damageJiri Lukas, University of Copenhagen, DenmarkHost: Yannick Schwab/Beate NeumannSmall Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 14 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedGene Myers, MPI-CBG, Dresden, GermanyHost: Stefano De RenzisThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 15 September 2017, 13:00Add to calendarStructure and function of a peptide transporter from E. coli

Yonca Ural-Blimke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 18 September 2017, 15:00Add to calendarThe Ethics of Biomedical Big Data: Between individual and public health interestsBrent Mittelstadt, University of Oxford, United KingdomHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
External Faculty Speaker
Thursday, 28 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedMiho Nakajima, The Neuroscience Institute Depts. of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Physiology NYU, Langone Medical Center, USAHost: Hiroki AsariCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Friday, 29 September 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedHelga Nowotny, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, SwitzerlandHost: Halldór Stefánsson CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
External Faculty Speaker
Monday, 2 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedEdward Lemke, EMBL Heidelberg, GermanyHost: Francesco BisiakEMBL Seminar Room, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 October 2017, 10:00Add to calendarSwitching genes on and off during erythropoiesisDouglas Higgs, MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United KingdomHost: Philip Avner / Christophe LancrinCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
External Faculty Speaker
Friday, 13 October 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedAlla Karpova, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Virginia, USA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 20 October 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedCy Jeffries, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 3 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarEpigenetic variation and non-genetic inheritanceAnne Ferguson-Smith, Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge , UK, United KingdomHost: Cornelius Gross / Irene BozzoniSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Thursday, 9 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedBing Ren, University of California, USAHost: Jan KorbelThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Wednesday, 15 November 2017, 11:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDavid Baker, University of Washington, USAHost: Janosch HennigThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 17 November 2017, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic mechanisms in early mammalian developmentMaria Elena Torres-Padilla, Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells (IES) , Helmholtz Zentrum München, GermanyHost: Philip Avner CNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract:
Science and Society
Thursday, 23 November 2017, 15:00Add to calendarMolecular gastronomy: questions of scientific strategy and applicationsHervé This, International Centre for Molecular Gastronomy AgroParisTech-INRA, FranceHost: Halldór StefánssonLarge Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
Abstract: Molecular gastronomy is the scientific discipline that looks for the mechanisms of phenomena occurring during food preparation. It was created (formally in 1988) because it was realized that a wealth of original phenomena were neglected by physical chemistry, so that possibilities of discoveries were many. It develops in many countries of the world (and should not be confused with cooking, and in particular with "molecular cooking" or "molecular cuisine", which are applications).
How to make discoveries? This question is of course not restricted to molecular gastronomy, but some examples of results can show various ways of getting scientific results, the most important being probably the set up of new observation tools, or the idea that "Any result should be considered as a "projection" of general cases that we have to invent".
Concerning applications, the latest is called "note by note cooking", and it is the exact equivalent of synthetic music, a reason why it could also be called synthetic cooking. The definition is simply: make food from pure compounds, instead of tradition food ingredients (vegetables, meats, fruits, fishs, eggs...). This culinary trend is spreading today.
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 24 November 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedDaniel Franke, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Hamburg Speaker
Friday, 1 December 2017, 13:00Add to calendarTo be announcedSpyros Chatziefthimiou, EMBL Hamburg, GermanySeminar Room 48e, EMBL Hamburg
Science and Society
Monday, 4 December 2017, 15:00Add to calendarImprobable Research and the Ig Nobel PrizesMarc Abrahams, Ig Nobel Prize, USAHost: Halldór StefánssonThe Operon, EMBL Heidelberg
EMBL - Sapienza Lecture
Friday, 12 January 2018, 11:00Add to calendarTransgenerational epigenetic inheritance: Evidence in mammals and potential mechanisms involving the germlineIsabelle Mansuy, University of Zürich and ETH Zürich, Zurich, SwitzerlandHost: Cornelius Gross / Andrea MeleSapienza Università di Roma - Aula Odeion - Museo dell'Arte Classica - P.le Aldo Moro, 5 - Roma, EMBL Monterotondo
Science and Society
Friday, 16 March 2018, 14:00Add to calendarTo be announcedProf. Bruno Strasser, Geneva University, SwitzerlandHost: Erika Pellegrini & Halldor StefanssonChadwick Amphitheatre, Institute Laue Langevin, Grenoble, EMBL Grenoble
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 6 April 2018, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenomic Signatures of Neuronal Diversity in the Mammalian BrainJoseph Ecker, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, USAHost: Cornelius GrossCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: DNA methylation is a chemical modification that occurs predominantly on CG dinucleotides in mammalian genomes. However, recent studies from our laboratory have revealed that non-CG methylation (mCH) is more abundant than CG methylation and non-randomly distributed in the genomes of brain cells. mCH accumulates during the establishment of neural circuits and is associated with Rett syndrome. A comprehensive understanding of how neural circuits spanning the entire brain generate the full repertoire of perception and behaviors requires a list of brain cell types, as well the means to target each cell type in order to interrogate the functional interactions that give rise to the emergent properties of the whole system. Neuronal diversity is essential for mammalian brain function but poses a challenge to molecular profiling. To facilitate cell-type-specific epigenomic studies, we have developed approaches to isolate nuclei from subtypes of neocortical neurons, revealing highly distinctive epigenomic landscapes. Hundreds of thousands of regions differ in chromatin accessibility and DNA methylation signatures characteristic of gene regulatory regions which are predicted to bind distinct cohorts of neuron subtype-specific transcription factors. Surprisingly, neuronal epigenomes reflect both past and present gene expression, with DNA hyper-methylation at developmentally critical genes appearing as a novel epigenomic signature in mature neurons. More recently, we have developed single cell methylome profiling methods that now allow an unbiased census of the diversity of neuronal cell types in the mammalian brain. Taken together, these approaches are beginning to link the functional and transcriptional complexity of neurons to their underlying epigenomic diversity.

EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 14 September 2018, 10:00Add to calendarTo be announcedJoanna Wysocka , Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine, Stanford, California, USAHost: Jamie HackettCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
EMBL Distinguished Visitor Lecture
Friday, 12 October 2018, 10:00Add to calendarEpigenetic regulation by histone acetylationAsifa Akhtar, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, and Epigenetics,Freiburg, Germany , , GermanyHost: Philip AvnerCNR Seminar Room, EMBL Monterotondo
Abstract: Our lab is studying the chromatin and epigenetic mechanisms regulated by histone acetylation using evolutionary conserved complexes associated with MOF, a MYST family of histone acetyl transferase. In files and mammals MOF is associated with the MSL and NSL complexes, which are important regulators of gene expression. In flies the MSL complex is well known for regulation of the X chromosome by the process of dosage compensation, while the NSL complex regulates expression of house keeping genes. In mammals, both complexes appear to be involved in regulating diverse cellular processes. The recent progress of our work will be presented.